Why MLK’s niece will speak at Beck’s rally: “It’s a matter of honor”

Did you know Dr. Martin Luther King’s niece, Dr. Alveda King, speaks today at Glenn Beck’s rally?  You wouldn’t from the MSM coverage of the event, decrying the horror of Beck claiming King’s mantle.  But to Alveda King, it makes perfect sense:

In front of the Lincoln Memorial in June, a group of students caught up in a moment of spontaneous patriotism broke into song. But the US Park Police were quick to shush the members of the Young America’s Foundation, saying singing is not allowed at the memorial. The song that was stifled? “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

So much for freedom of speech.

At the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta this July, an official at the memorial to one of the greatest civil rights leaders in the world – my Uncle Martin – removed a bullhorn from the hands of Father Frank Pavone, an internationally recognized leader of the pro-life movement. We were a group more than 100 strong, in Atlanta to declare that abortion is the greatest violation of civil rights in our day. We brought a wreath to lay at Uncle Martin’s grave while we prayed, but due to a King Center official’s barricade at the gravesite, we weren’t allowed. The National Park Service said that would constitute a demonstration.

So much for freedom of assembly.

Americans are hungry to reclaim the symbols of our liberty, hard won by an unlikely group of outnumbered, outgunned, underfunded patriots determined not to live in servitude to the British Empire. If we want to sing the national anthem at a memorial to the man who led this fledgling nation out of slavery, and made my people free, we should be able to send our voices soaring to the heavens.

Glenn Beck’s “Rally to Restore Honor” this Saturday will give us that chance, and that’s why I feel it’s important for me to be there.

Before the words were out of Mr. Beck’s mouth announcing the Aug. 28 rally, The New York Times noted that it would be at the same place and 47 years to the day since my Uncle Martin gave his “I Have a Dream Speech.” When asked why he chose that date in particular, Beck said he had not realized its significance, but in thinking about it, he saw it is an auspicious day to rally for the honor of the American people. He has said, and he’s right, that Martin Luther King didn’t speak only for African-Americans. He spoke for all Americans, and his words still ring true.

Read the rest.  Dr. King is the director for African-American outreach for Priests for Life. 

For the first time since moving, I miss being in DC.  It’s not the same as being there, but via Mommy Life, here’s streaming video of the event.   Hot Air also has an open thread with streaming video.  I had better luck with the latter but am in a hurry to start staining the deck.  Fun, eh?

Though it looks like Stacy and Smitty are lost,  I’m not counting them out just yet.  Will be heading to The Other McCain later for updates, and I suggest you do the same.

H/T: Memeorandum for all the latest in MSM lefty rage.

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