Unionized schools: doubling down on stupid

Stupid to continue the same tired formula with no success, that is. From the Colorado Springs Gazette, a grim look at student data:

Thousands of Colorado students are behind in school and most are unlikely to ever catch up.

More than 100,000 public school students in Colorado are not on track to become proficient in math or writing within three years or by the time they reach the 10th grade, according to a data analysis by I-News. That’s more than one-fifth of the 485,000 students taking the state’s annual tests.

In reading, more than 80,000 students are substandard, and the percent not catching up increased this year.

“We’ve gone as far as we can go,” said Jo O’Brien, assistant commissioner in the Office of Assessment and Research and Evaluation at the Colorado Department of Education. “Students not scoring proficient can’t seem to rise and tend to stay behind through graduation.”

That’s if they ever graduate. Can we all agree that state-run schools with strong teachers’ unions isn’t the way to educate the masses? How can a kid–identified early in his student career as in need of help–manage to never improve? It isn’t the lack of money, folks. It’s the tired, multi-culti approach that tells children good grammar is inherently racist. It excuses the lack of knowledge as culturally relevant. It demeans children who crave real knowledge with the garbage curricula they’re fed. 
 
My old principal used to say: if the student hasn’t learned, the teacher hasn’t taught. I rebelled against that for a while, arguing that it places the largest burden upon the teacher while excusing the student from any responsibility. And make no mistake: a kid has to agree to want to learn. But he was right, if the student hasn’t learned, the teacher hasn’t taught. The educational problems faced by school districts everywhere won’t be solved with unionized teachers forever protected from any responsibility or accountability of what their students learn.
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3 Responses

  1. One problem that we can’t get around is the fact that in some households education is just not a priority.

    Children need both good teachers and parents who care.

  2. “How can a kid–identified early in his student career as in need of help–manage to never improve? It isn’t the lack of money, folks. It’s the tired, multi-culti approach that tells children good grammar is inherently racist. It excuses the lack of knowledge as culturally relevant. It demeans children who crave real knowledge with the garbage curricula they’re fed. ”
    So true. It also has to do with family. I suspect many of them don’t have fathers.

    • Absolutely. I remember a study done a while back that showed the kids who have “naturally” larger vocabularies were spoken to more and watched less tv. Think: talking at the table over dinner or over an after-school snack. I guess the kids in dual-earner homes “naturally” don’t have the same opportunity.

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